Causes and Consequences of Political Violence

Eda Keremoglu-Waibler

Tuesdays, 13:30 - 15:00, D432

This course offers an introduction to the literature on political violence, with an emphasis on contemporary quantitative work. Particular attention is paid to civil wars, but other forms of political violence, such as interstate wars and electoral violence, are also covered. In an introductory step, the seminar addresses definitions and conceptual issues before proceeding along two broad dimensions: (i) What are potential causes of political violence? What role do economic, political, and ethnic factors play? (ii) What are the social, political, and economic consequences of political violence? The course engages with studies that focus on different levels of analysis (subnational, national, transnational) and on different actors (state, non-state).

Prerequisites: The course focuses on the quantitative empirical literature on political violence. Students should therefore have a good understanding of analytical research design and quantitative statistical methods.

Comparative Authoritarian Politics 

Eda Keremoglu-Waibler

Tuesdays, 17:00 - 18:30, C422

"[...] dictatorships are by far the most understudied area in comparative politics. We need to start thinking about it" (Przeworski 2003). The resilient number and variety of non-democratic regimes has led to a resurgence of theoretical approaches and empirical studies that revolve around authoritarian politics. This course provides a systematic overview of contemporary authoritarian research with a focus on quantitative studies and engages with four aspects in more detail. In an introductory step, the course addresses issues of conceptualizing and measuring autocracy: What is an authoritarian regime, how does it differ from a democratic one, and what types of autocracies can be distinguished? Second, the course engages with authoritarian resilience: How do authoritarian governments stay in power and which factors impede democratization? The third part deals with authoritarian performance: How do autocracies perform economically and socially and what explains (potential) differences? Lastly, how is authoritarian rule linked to violent conflict on the domestic and international level?

Prerequisites: The course focuses on the contemporary literature on authoritarian politics and engages with quantitative empirical studies. Students should therefore have a good understanding of analytical research design and quantitative statistical methods.